Former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton made history as she became the first woman in America to be a major party’s presidential nominee, after a string of victories on the final Super Tuesday of the Democratic primary season.

After a long and contentious primary process, Hillary Clinton became the first woman in American history to be a major party’s presidential nominee. A string of victories on the final Super Tuesday of the primary calendar pushed her total delegate count past the 2,383 threshold. The former secretary of state won Democratic primaries in California, New Jersey, New Mexico and South Dakota, putting her total delegate count at 2,755, as you can see in the InsideGov visualization below.

The biggest prize of Tuesday night was California, where 548 total delegates were up for grabs. Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders crisscrossed the state in the weeks leading up to the primary, hanging his campaign’s hopes on a strong showing there. Polls leading up to the primary indicated a tight race, but the results show Clinton won by a larger margin than anticipated. With 99.7 percent reporting, Clinton has 56.6 percent of the vote to Sanders’ 42.4 percent.

Sanders performed better in the northern and eastern parts of California, while Clinton did well in urban and coastal areas in the lower two-thirds of the state. She logged definitive victories in San Francisco and Los Angeles counties, for example, where she won by 11.7 percent and 18.4 percent, respectively.

California is an expansive state, with a diverse and large population. A recent poll indicated that Sanders had made inroads with Hispanic voters in California, with 46 percent in support of him.

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